February 1st to 5th 2016
Olhão, Portugal
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Technical and Economic viability of Traps in the Portuguese Fishery of deep-water rose shrimp (Parapenaeus longirostris)

Oral Presentation
Natural Resources
Wednesday, February 3, 2016 -
16:15 to 16:30

Eichert, M. 1 Blanc, N. 2 Marques, L. 3 Fonseca, P. 4 Campos, A. 5 Henriques, V. 6 Castro, M. 7

1Centre of Marine Sciences (CCMAR), University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal
2Centre of Marine Sciences (CCMAR), University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal
3Centre of Marine Sciences (CCMAR), University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal
4Instituto Português do Mar e da Atmosfera (IPMA)
5Instituto Português do Mar e da Atmosfera (IPMA)
6Instituto Português do Mar e da Atmosfera (IPMA)
7Centre of Marine Sciences (CCMAR), University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal

The Marine Strategic Framework Directive and the Reformed Common Fisheries Policy are following the ambitious objective to stop the loss of biodiversity and to make fisheries more sustainable. The exploitation of deepwater rose shrimp (Parapenaeus longirostris) and other nektobenthic crustacean is exclusively reserved to the demersal trawling with enormous bycatch proportions exceeding economical, ecological and ethical limits. The other side of the damages is the social inequity by distributing the revenues of high value crustaceans only over a small proportion of fisherman. The promising results with semi-floating traps in the Canary Islands have shown that alternative fishing practices exit. The following work was done to provide information about the feasibility using of semi-floating traps on the edge of the continental shelf and upper slope in a commonly trawling dominated territory. The catch of the deepwater rose shrimp showed to be a challenging task due to the specific feeding habits of the species. More frequently the golden shrimp (Pelsionika martia) was caught, a species already commercially exploited with traps in the Canary Islands. The quantities for both species are not allowing the consideration of an economic viable fishery but the use of alternative attractants may change this in the future. The golden shrimp showed a significant preference for minced oily fish in relation to other fish baits and moderately successful catches with fluorescent fishing lights. The use of light as attractant in traps for crustaceans is reported for the first time during this study and should be further investigated because it can be a possible solution make trap fisheries for deepwater rose shrimp bait independent and economically viable.
keywords: 
demersal trawl, traps, nektobenthic shrimp, gear substitution

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